Rolls-Royce Dawn, Wraith Sales Ending In The US

The 2021 model year will be the last on our shores, but Rolls-Royce’s two-door line will carryon overseas.

All good things must come to an end, and if we’re to believe one well-heeled consumer, that includes the Rolls-Royce Wraith and Dawn. The brand’s two coupes will reportedly head off to that big polo match in the sky later this year. Speaking to Motor1.com under condition of anonymity, a Rolls client says that he received information from a dealer, who in turn had just been informed by the folks in Goodwood that the 2021 models will be the last two-doors the company sells in the US for the time being.

The end of Dawn/Wraith sales isn’t too surprising, but the reasoning kind of is. According to our source, it’s US regulatory issues that are dooming the coupe and drophead on our shores, rather than any production or sales problem. The fraternal twins will still be available in overseas markets for the time being. While the end of US sales is no fault of the Wraith or Dawn, we feel confident the aging platform that underpins these two is contributing to Rolls-Royce’s decision.

While both cars still sit at the pinnacle of two-door luxury, their bones date back to a BMW 7 Series that first debuted in 2008. The so-called F01 platform that underpins Rolls’ two-doors is so old, in fact, that BMW is already preparing a redesign of its replacement. Meanwhile, the Ghost sedan has joined the larger Phantom four-door and the popular Cullinan SUV on Rolls-Royce’s Architecture of Luxury.

As for what the future holds, we very much doubt these are the last two-door Rolls-Royce models we’ll see – beyond the fact that sales were strong before the COVID-19 pandemic, the company simply has too long of a track record with coupes and dropheads for the Dawn and Wraith to mark the end of the line. That ultimately doesn’t change the fact that for ultra-wealthy Americans, they need to weigh whether it’s better to snap up a two-door Roller now or wait until some undetermined date in the future for their near-inevitable successors. Oh, the trials of being fabulously rich.

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