Delphi Drops Steering And Suspension Parts For Tesla Model S

Auto parts supplier Delphi Technologies has launched new aftermarket steering and suspension components for the Tesla Model S electric sedan. 

The parts form the groundwork of a full chassis solution covering some 165,000 Model S EVs currently in operation in North America and some 77,000 units in Europe. 

Designed to the latest manufacturer specifications, the new components for the Tesla Model S include control arms, link stabilizers, tie rods, and ball joints. They are compatible with a total of 15 sub-models, including the Model S P100D featuring the “Cheetah” mode.

The manufacturer says the new parts have shown impressive performance and safety testing during development. It claims the heat-treatment in the design of the control arm body “shows better strength and fatigue life than that of the OEM design.

In addition, the tested push and pull force of the ball stud indicates the Delphi Technologies design also has “superior strength compared to the OEM component.” That’s reassuring to hear given that these are parts that come under a lot of stress during braking and steering.

“Our new steering and suspension line-up is additional proof of our unwavering commitment to quality and safety. The latest testing data is very impressive and makes these parts the go-to solution for workshops wanting to offer a high calibre service. We believe there should be no compromise on the standards for an aftermarket part, especially when safety and driver experience are fundamental measures of a high quality product.”

Neil Fryer, Delphi Technologies Vice President Global Marketing, Product and Strategic Planning

The new components are in addition to Delphi Technologies’ existing aftermarket parts for the Tesla Model S, such as brake pads, discs, and accessories. 

Together, these parts will allow workshops to offer a variety of repairs and replacements for the popular electric sedan, ultimately allowing owners to keeping more examples on the road for longer.


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