Jet-Powered Cheese Wedge Car For Sale Is Wisconsin At Its Best

Serious inquiries only.

Facebook marketplace is already a weird and wonderful place, but it recently upped its game with the cheese-n-ator, a jet-powered cheese wedge-shaped car. Up for sale in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, the project was built by Dieter Sturm, a connoisseur of engineering and fine dairy products.

Yes, your eyes don’t deceive you, that is a jet engine that sits behind the driver. Thrust output is unknown, but there’s a 6 horsepower (4.4 kilowatt) gas engine onboard for those lacking the cojones to fire the jet. As a turnkey solution, the vehicle is for sale at an eye-watering $16000, but it’s clear that you can’t put a price on a flame-throwing wedge on wheels. For the lactose-intolerant petrolhead, the price also includes a bonus micro monster truck body.

Gallery: Jet Powered Cheese Wedge






With so many different cheeses to choose from, we’d wager this thing takes after sharp cheddar, but thankfully the body panels are decorated with more than just cheese effect; the sides are delicately festooned with flames that reveal skulls in the blaze upon further inspection. Apart from the pseudo-Ghost-Rider aesthetic, the flames are fitting, because jet engines have a tendency to ignite anything in their wake.

Before your cheese stick melts in your lap from the price, don’t fret, because this thing is more than just a wedge in your wallet. Apart from jet propulsion being incredibly expensive, it produces equally phenomenal performance. While a demo video of the cheese-n-ator wouldn’t go amiss, jet engines are capable of producing massive amounts of propulsion in a very small package – all while producing an extraordinary amount of noise, fire, and smoke.

Performance aside, this project is a great example of what’s possible in the automotive world with no limits. Did anyone ask for a jet-powered cheese wedge? No. But damn, this thing is cool and we’d bite your arm off to get behind the wheel.

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